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Boujdad Warns of the Danger of Algeria's Nuclear Reactors to Morocco

Ahmed Boujdad, a professor of political science at Mohammed V University in Rabat, urged Morocco to be vigilant about the nuclear projects of Algeria, the Kingdom’s eastern neighbor. He said that  ... Algeria’s nuclear reactors, which are supposed to exist for peaceful purposes, have expanded greatly, “but no one is talking about them.”

Jun 06, 2016
AUTHOR: Mohammed Arraaji

 

Boujdad Warns of the Danger of Algeria's Nuclear Reactors to Morocco

 

By Mohammed Arraaji
Translation by Maya Hardimon
June 6, 2016

Ahmed Boujdad, a professor of political science at Mohammed V University in Rabat, urged Morocco to be vigilant about the nuclear projects of Algeria, the Kingdom’s eastern neighbor. He said that Algeria has a very large nuclear program that no one in Morocco is talking about even though the two countries are neighbors.

While speaking at a seminar organized by the College of Legal, Economic, and Social Sciences in Rabat’s neighborhood of Agdal, Boujdad said that there were American intelligence reports saying that Algeria’s nuclear reactors, which are supposed to exist for peaceful purposes, have expanded greatly, “but no one is talking about them.”

However, the professor expects the Polisario Front to meet the same fate as a number of other separatist movements in different regions of the world that failed in their endeavors. He said “whoever leads a secessionist movement must realize that movements that spent decades fighting for secession ended up handing over their arms.”

As examples, Boujdad spoke of a number of secessionist movements that led long struggles for secession before succumbing to reality such as FARC in Colombia and the Irish Republican Army. “The most important separatist movements in the world ended positively, as they returned to the embrace of the countries they were eager to be independent from,” Boujdad said.

On the other hand, he cited examples of movements that managed to secede and became failed states such as Timor-Leste, which has a population of only 1 million, the Aceh region of Indonesia, the Bahar Islands, and South Sudan, which Boujdad said “emerged from secession only to enter into further separation.” He added that “the fate of secessionist movements throughout history has been failure.”

With regard to the Polisario Front, Boujdad linked its positions to the dictates of Algeria’s rulers, saying “there is no political mind that can explain how a secessionist movement can reject an offer of extended autonomy such as that extended by Morocco to the separatist organization. The only explanation of this rejection is that this imaginary movement is merely a basic tool in the hands of Algeria.”

He went on to say that the Polisario Front will not accept any solution “even if Morocco gives it what it wants, and it will reject all solutions offered by Morocco because the matter is not in their hands but in the hands of Algeria; they cannot talk about any solution to the Sahara issue without invoking Algeria.”

Boujdad attributed Algeria’s enmity toward Morocco to “Algerian national security, as Algerians do not agree with or understand one another, while Janissary systems left behind by the Ottomans still prevail.” He added that “the rulers in Algeria do not agree with one another, but they do agree on their hostility toward Morocco, which is strongly present in their foreign and domestic policy.”

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