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Reactors Large and Small: Three Hurdles

On March 25, 2020, NPEC's Executive Director, Henry Sokolski, gave the following lecture at the University of Utah:

Reactors Large and Small: Three Hurdles

Assuming we survive the Coronavirus, we still will need electricity and will want to avoid the risk of global warming. What's unclear is how much might nuclear power be needed to generate electricity and keep our environment clean. To answer this question, we need to know how competitive current large reactors are against their nonnuclear alternatives and how competitive proposed small modular reactors might be. How economical, safe, proliferation-resistant are these reactors? To help us get the answers, Henry Sokolski, Executive Director of Nonproliferation Policy Education Center, has offered to give us this presentation.

Mar 25, 2020
AUTHOR: Henry Sokolski

Reactors Large and Small: Three Hurdles

Henry Sokolski

University of Utah

 

Reactors Large and Small: An Overview

 

The Poor Economics of Large Reactors: Construction Costs

 

New Large Reactors: Too Pricey to Compete

 

Large Reactors, Attempt to Cut Containment Costs

 

Large Reactor Accidents and the Lack of Adequate Insurrance

 

Large Reactors: Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Risks

 

Why Might Small Reactors Do Better?

 

Small Modular Reactors: Economic, Safety, and Proliferation Issues

 

How to Sniff Out What Makes Sense

The Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC), is a 501 (c)3 nonpartisan, nonprofit, educational organization
founded in 1994 to promote a better understanding of strategic weapons proliferation issues. NPEC educates policymakers, journalists,
and university professors about proliferation threats and possible new policies and measures to meet them.
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