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HOME > About Us > BOOKS      
Getting MAD: Nuclear Mutual Assured Destruction, Its Origins and Practice
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Published on: Nov 2004
Notes:

Getting MAD: Nuclear Mutual Assured Destruction, Its Origins and Practice is the first critical history of the intellectual roots and actual application of the strategic doctrine of nuclear mutual assured destruction or MAD. Written by the world's leading French, British, and American military policy planners and analysts, this volume examines how MAD and its emphasis on the military targeting of population centers influenced the operational plans of the major nuclear powers and smaller nuclear states such as Pakistan, India, and Israel. Given America's efforts to move away from MAD and the continued reliance on MAD thinking by smaller nations to help justify further nuclear proliferation, Getting MAD is a timely must read for anyone eager to understand our nuclear past and future. 

Published by:

The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College

Edited by NPEC executive director Henry Sokolski - 2004

Checking Iran's Nuclear Ambitions
Click here for the complete book and individual chapters
Published on: Jan 2004
Notes:

The fear about what Iran might do with nuclear weapons is fed by the concern that Tehran has no clear reason to be pursuing nuclear weapons. The strategic rationale for Iran's nuclear program is by no means obvious. Unlike proliferators such as Israel or Pakistan, Iran faces no historic enemy who would welcome an opportunity to wipe the state off the face of the earth. Nevertheless, Iran's nuclear program poses a stark challenge to the international nonproliferation regime and raises stark shortcomings with global nonproliferation norms, namely the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons. If the world community, led by Western countries, is unable to prevent Iranian proliferation, then it is unclear that there is much meaning to global nonproliferation norms. 

Published by:

The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College

Edited by Patrick Clawson and  NPEC executive director Henry Sokolski - 2004

Beyond Nunn-Lugar: Curbing the Next Wave of Weapons Proliferation Threats from Russia
Click here for the complete book and individual chapters
Published on: Apr 2002
Notes:

This book was originally commissioned by the NPEC as part of a study on the future of U.S.-Russian nonproliferation cooperation. It is different from other studies of U.S.-Russian cooperation because it relies on competitive strategies, which detail how best to pit one's strengths against a competitor's weaknesses in a series of moves and countermoves. The goal is to devise strategies that force one's competitor to spend more time and resources shoring up his weaknesses than in taking offensive action. 

Published by:

The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College

Edited by Thomas Riisager and NPEC executive director Henry Sokolski - 2002

Planning for a Peaceful Korea
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Published on: Feb 2001
Notes:

With the change of administrations in Washington, current U.S. policy toward North Korea will naturally undergo review and scrutiny. The essays in this volume offer an option to the Clinton-era engagement approach. The authors suggest an alternative strategy for promoting peace and security in the Korean peninsula different from the ones contemplated or implemented by Washington in recent years. 

Published by:

The Strategic Studies Institute Publications Office, United States Army War College

Edited by NPEC executive director Henry Sokolski - 2001

Twenty First Century Weapons Proliferation
Click here for the table of contents and to order the book
Published on: Jan 2001
Notes:

A decade after Coalition forces targeted Saddam's missile, nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons capabilities, public concern about strategic weapons proliferation has grown. India, Iraq, North Korea, China, and Pakistan have all renewed their efforts to acquire weapons capable of mass destruction. Meanwhile, growing surpluses of weapons-usable materials in the US, Russia, Japan, and Europe have raised the specter of nuclear theft, and with the Tokyo sarin attacks of 1995, the most horrific forms of terrorism.

What should we make of these threats? Are the planned responses of the US and its allies sufficient? Will history ultimately end in a more prosperous, democratic, and peaceful world? In this book, leading national security practioners from the administrations of Presidents Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton share their insights. Their analyses, along with those of other experts and the editors of two leading journals terrorism and the Middle East, not only clarify the weapons proliferation threats the US and its friends will face, but suggest what new policies their governments must consider.

Published by:

Frank Cass Publishers

Edited by James M. Ludes and NPEC executive director Henry Sokolski - 2001

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The Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC), is a 501 (c)3 nonpartisan, nonprofit, educational organization
founded in 1994 to promote a better understanding of strategic weapons proliferation issues. NPEC educates policymakers, journalists,
and university professors about proliferation threats and possible new policies and measures to meet them.
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