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More of NPEC’s Work
A chronological listing by resource:

Articles | Occasional Papers & Monographs | Interviews | Official Docs & Letters | Op-Eds & Blogs | Press Releases | Presentations | Audio & Video | Testimony & Transcripts | Translations | Wargame Reports
 
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Europe
Mar 16, 2020 Missile Wars: What's Coming
On March 16, 2020, NPEC's Executive Director, Henry Sokolski gave the following lecture at University of California: San Diego. Missile Wars: What's Coming Since the 1970s, military theorists have predicted wars would be waged with super precise missiles that would penetrate most defenses. Recent successful missile attacks against oil facilities at Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia, and Ain Assad Airbase in Iraq suggest that their predictions have come true. How real is this revolution? What new civilian and military targets might now be vulnerable that previously were not? In the case of civilian targets, such as nuclear power plants and cities, what are the moral and military considerations? This presentation will answer these questions.
Presentations; Audio & Video
Jan 23, 2020 Dealing Preventively with NPT Withdrawal
  Last week, Pierre Goldschmidt, former Deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency for Safeguards, spoke on theHill and visited senior officials in the executive branch. The NPEC-commissioned paper he presented (see below) focused on what’sneeded to deter additional withdrawals from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). His suggestions could not be more timely. In January, Iran’s foreign minister threatened to leave the NPT. His threat came only months after Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, complained at the United Nations General Assembly that the world’s recognized nuclear armed states should give up their nuclear weapons or allow all other nations to get them. Erdoğan’s complaint followed Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman’s public announcement that Riyadh would leave the NPT if Iran was found developing nuclear weapons. The last time a country withdrew from the NPT was North Korea in January of 2003. At the time, Pyongyang was able to withdraw, expelled all resident IAEA nuclear inspectors, and was not even sanctioned. Only after North Korea exploded a nuclear device did the United Nations impose economic sanctions. This is not a model to follow. Instead, as Mr. Goldschmidt recommends, the United States should work with like-minded states to promote country-neutral rules before the next state gets its first bomb. The United States should also take up Mr. Goldschmidt’s recommendations with the Russians and Chinese.  
Occasional Papers & Monographs
Sep 09, 2019 "The United States Should Follow France's Lead in Space," Space News
Last week, President Trump authorized the re-creation of the Air Force Space Command. Its aim is to make America great in space. In pursuit of putting America first though, it would be useful to pay attention to a smaller space faring nation -- France, which just announced its new space strategy. In the attached Space News op-ed, "The United States should follow France's lead in space," Brian Chow and I argure that the French plan is worth emulating. The French space policy calls for the development of bodyguard spacecraft.  These spacecraft would protect key satellites from possibly being attacked by robotic rendezvous spacecraft. The French also want to create space exclusion zones. Brian and I recommend that the U.S. join forces with the French. In specific, the U.S. should work with the French at the next NATO Summit this December to convince NATO to expand France's bodyguard program and to create appropriate self-defense zones around the most vulnerable, critical allied satellites. This piece, "The U.S. Should  Follow France's Lead in Space," by NPEC Executive Director, Henry Sokolski and Brian Chow, an independent policy analyst, was published in Space News.
Op-Eds & Blogs
Nov 14, 2018 Interview with Patrick Malone on INF and Restrictions on China
Henry Sokolski and Patrick Malone discuss the effects of the US withdrawing from the INF and new restrictions on nuclear exports to China.
Interviews; Audio & Video
May 06, 2013 Greg Jones: America's 1962 Reactor-Grade Plutonium Weapons Test Revisited
In 1977, the U.S. declassified the fact that in 1962 it had successfully tested a nuclear weapon using reactor-grade plutonium.  In 1994 additional information about this test was released.  Though on the face of it this test would seem to definitively settle the issue about whether reactor-grade plutonium can be used in nuclear weapons, ironically the specifics related to this nuclear test have generated some of the most controversy.  
Occasional Papers & Monographs
Feb 27, 2012 Bruno Tertrais: Nuclear Coup? France, the Algerian War and the April 1961 Nuclear Test
Bruno Tertrais examines the history surrounding France's April 1961 Nuclear Test and aims to draw lessons for possible future contingencies where a nuclear-capable country is threatened from inside and the control of nuclear materials or weapons may be at risk.
Occasional Papers & Monographs
Nov 21, 2011 Victor Gilinsky Provides a Summary of NPEC and the Legatum Institute's London Conference
Victor Gilinsky provides a summary of the five different panels and panelist presentations for the London conference cohosted by NPEC and the Legatum Institute titled, "Reassessing Nuclear Nonproliferation's Key Premises."
Occasional Papers & Monographs
Nov 21, 2011 Patrick Roberts's Presentation on the Ability of the IAEA to Safeguard Nuclear Materials if Nuclear Power Expands
On Nov 21, 2011, Virginia Tech Professor Patrick Roberts conducted a presentation in London entitled "Scaling Up Safeguards: How Well will the IAEA Be Able to Safeguard Nuclear Materials in More States."
Presentations
Jul 01, 2011 NPEC's Executive Director in the New Atlantis: Unleashing the Nuclear Watchdog
In the New Atlantis, NPEC's Executive Director argues that conflicts within and among the IAEA's various missions, including its “safeguarding” mission, threaten to undermine its ability to detect potential military nuclear diversions in a timely fashion. 
Articles
Jun 30, 2011 Henry Sokolski in the Weekly Standard: Europe's Anti-Nuclear Power Outburst
NPEC's Executive Director argues that Europe’s current nuclear intermission is less a political show than an energy policy experiment to determine what the safest, cleanest, cheapest energy future is.
Op-Eds & Blogs
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The Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC), is a 501 (c)3 nonpartisan, nonprofit, educational organization
founded in 1994 to promote a better understanding of strategic weapons proliferation issues. NPEC educates policymakers, journalists,
and university professors about proliferation threats and possible new policies and measures to meet them.
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